Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET)

The term 'Technical and Vocational Education and Training or TVET is used as an umbrella term to include education and training activities, that provide skills for employment.

Key Points for UPSC Prelims

  • The term TVET was first officially recognized at the World Congress on TVET in 1999 in Seoul, Republic of Korea.
  • It incorporates similarly used terms like Workforce Education (WE), and Technical-Vocational Education (TVE).
  • The recognition led to the development of the UNESCO-UNEVOC International Centre for Technical and Vocational Education and Training in Bonn, Germany

State of the Education Report for India 2020: TVET launched by UNESCO India

  • UNESCO India virtually launched the ‘State of the Education Report for India 2020: Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) recently.
  • This is the second edition of the State of the Education Report for India; the 1st edition was released in 2019. This edition of the report focuses on Technical and Vocational Education and Training.
  • As per the National Policy of Skill Development and Entrepreneurship (NPSDE) 2015, India has made significant progress towards its goal of creating a skilled workforce of 110 million people by the year 2022.
  • At present, India is providing training to 10 million youth annually through different schemes.
  • The Report has provided an overview of the current capacity for TVET provision through educational institutions such as schools, colleges, and universities; through short-term and long-term courses, and by the state as well as non-state actors.
  • The report has also provided 10 recommendations for India to help in achieving the stated vision for TVET.

10 Recommendations of the Report

  • Placing learners and their ambitions at the centre of vocational education and training programmes.
  • Creating an ecosystem for trainers, teachers, and assessors.
  • Focus on lifelong learning, upskilling, and re-skilling.
  • Ensuring inclusive access to TVET for differently-abled and disadvantaged learners as well as women.
  • Expanding digitalization of vocational education and training
  • Supporting local communities in generating livelihoods by engaging in the conservation of cultural heritage; both tangible and intangible.
  • Better alignment with the Sustainable Development Agenda 2030
  • Deploying innovative models of TVET financing
  • Expanding evidence-based research for improved planning and monitoring
  • Establishing a strong coordinating mechanism for inter-ministerial cooperation

The Report has been developed by a team of researchers from Mumbai’s Tata Institute of Social Sciences under the guidance of UNESCO New Delhi.

Written by IAS POINT

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